Travel Nursing FAQ's

The minimum experience requirements depend on your area of specialty, the facility, unit and sometimes even the location. The facilities we work with have different requirements and preferences, but the majority request a minimum of 18 months of experience. For some specialties such as Med-Surg, Psych and Rehab, the minimum can be as high as two years.

Someone who is flexible, has a positive outlook, is eager to learn new skills and enjoys a new adventure makes an excellent travel nurse. Travel RN's should have excellent clinical skills and be able to adapt to a new clinical setting quickly and easily.

Most hospital hiring managers are familiar with the travel health care industry and will view this experience on your resume as a bonus. Working as a travel nurse demonstrates your dedication to your profession and an ability to adapt effectively in a variety of clinical settings.

A wide range of health care facilities use travel nurses, from prestigious teaching facilities and world-class research facilities, to small community hospital and health care centers. You can work with your recruiter to find the travel assignment location and type of facility that meets your goals.

Each hospital will provide its own orientation program to ensure you learn the specifics of the new facility. Your recruiter will be able to give you details about the orientation process, but this is a great question to ask the hiring managers at potential assignment locations during the interview process.

The best travel nurse companies will provide you with all the necessary information you need to obtain the required licensure for your assignment state before your assignment begins. Each state has its own rules and regulations, which change frequently, so we recommend that you contact the state boards of nursing directly. State links can be found under "Travel Resources".

Most assignments are 13 weeks, but can range anywhere from 4 weeks to more than a year. It's also possible to extend an assignment at a facility, which many travelers do.

No. You will sign a new contract for each assignment period.

A 40-hour work week is considered full time for travelers working eight or 10-hour shifts. For travelers who work 12-hour shifts, 36-hour work weeks are considered full time. Most travel nurse contracts will guarantee a minimum weekly payment for a full-time schedule.